“Sticking” it to high populations of thrips in greenhouse crops.

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Can patterned tapes significantly improve thrips catches?

You’ve likely noticed by now that thrips populations are especially high because of the hot, dry summer. Many growers are noticing their usual biocontrol programs can’t keep up, and further defenses are needed this year.

The use of mass trapping strategies may be the key to getting an edge over thrips. This post discusses the latest research on mass trapping of thrips in ornamentals, including patterned sticky tapes and the use of pheromones.  

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Where do thrips come from? YOUR MUM(s).

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Thrips damage on mums.

Hopefully my bad attempt at a “Your Momma” joke will get your attention, because this is an important post.

Ongoing research by Rose Buitenhuis’ Lab at Vineland has shown that an incredible number of thrips and spider mites come in on imported mum cuttings. Here’s the scoop and what you can do about it.

 

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Ramping up thrips biocontrol BEFORE they get out of control!

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Western flower thrips adult on an open Mandevilla flower.  Photo credit: Caitlin MacDonald, USEL student.

Now that the warm weather is finally upon us, it’s time to start worrying about thrips control.

What we’ve learned over the years is that pesticides just don’t cut it – the only reliable chemical for western flower thrips in Ontario is DDVP, which requires constant application.  This means biological control is your best bet.  Here’s a summary of the most effective tools, tricks, and timing, to ensure your biocontrol dollars are well spent.

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Banishing Broad Mite – New post in Floriculture IPM Blog

I’ve been getting a lot of calls lately about Broad Mites (Polyphagotarsonemus latus) in crops like New Guinea impatiens, torenia, begonias, exacum, ipomea and gerbera.  Broad mite can also attack chrysanthemums, so it’s time to start thinking about  control of this pest as you’re sticking your new cuttings. Read on for tips on monitoring and control.

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