The Rugose Virus Threat – Will it Affect Your Spring Crops?

Tomatoes infected with the Rugose virus. Photo courtesy of HortiDaily.

By now,  you may of heard of the Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus (ToBRFV), referred to more simply as “Rugose”. It is a viral disease that predominately impacts tomato plants, but also peppers, leaving fruit damaged and unmarketable.

 

It was first detected in Israel in 2014 but has now been found in parts of North America.

If you are a Canadian ornamental grower that ALSO grows tomato liners as part of your spring crop selection, or if you grow ORNAMENTAL PEPPERS, here is what you need to know regarding Rugose symptoms, prevention and more importantly, regulations.

Continue reading “The Rugose Virus Threat – Will it Affect Your Spring Crops?”

Which Thrips are in Your Flower Crops (Part II): How to ID and Control Onion Thrips

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Thrips tabaci, or Onion thrips. Photo courtesy of Thrips-ID.com.

If you were at the Canadian Greenhouse Conference (or are regularly reading this blog!) you’d know we’ve recently identified Onion thrips as a pest of floriculture crops in Ontario (see this post).

Outside of Ontario?  Well, this still may apply to you, as a recent study in France also indicated that up to 47% of pest thrips in floriculture greenhouses were Onion thrips.  So, this issue could be wide-spread.

My last post covered the extent of the problem in Ontario’s industry.  This post will help you identify if YOU are dealing with Onion thrips (OT) along with Western flower thrips (WFT), and what to do about it.

 

Continue reading “Which Thrips are in Your Flower Crops (Part II): How to ID and Control Onion Thrips”

“Pot Gnats” in the Greenhouse – A Special Kind of Gross.

An Entomologist by training, it generally takes a lot to gross me out. (I’m constantly suppressing shrieks of “It’s adorable!” when growers show me aphids).  But now that it’s dark and wet in the greenhouse, there’s been a sudden appearance of a rather unlovable pest some growers have been referring to as “Pot Worm”.

Not an actual worm at all, this pest is a lover of over-watering and fungal production. Read on to find out what it REALLY is, and how to control it.

Continue reading ““Pot Gnats” in the Greenhouse – A Special Kind of Gross.”