The Rugose Virus Threat – Will it Affect Your Spring Crops?

Tomatoes infected with the Rugose virus. Photo courtesy of HortiDaily.

By now,  you may of heard of the Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus (ToBRFV), referred to more simply as “Rugose”. It is a viral disease that predominately impacts tomato plants, but also peppers, leaving fruit damaged and unmarketable.

 

It was first detected in Israel in 2014 but has now been found in parts of North America.

If you are a Canadian ornamental grower that ALSO grows tomato liners as part of your spring crop selection, or if you grow ORNAMENTAL PEPPERS, here is what you need to know regarding Rugose symptoms, prevention and more importantly, regulations.

Continue reading “The Rugose Virus Threat – Will it Affect Your Spring Crops?”

New Virus in Greenhouse Crops: Important Info Sessions Available Tues and Thurs

ToBRFV is a new virus on the greenhouse scene.

A new, potentially serious plant virus – the Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus – is moving through crops across Europe and the U.S.  As this virus can affect both tomatoes, peppers, and potentially some floral hosts, OMAFRA is running information workshops in Niagara and Leamington to answer grower questions about potential threats to our industry.

Read on for a description of the virus and workshop dates.

Continue reading “New Virus in Greenhouse Crops: Important Info Sessions Available Tues and Thurs”

TSWV sysmptoms in mums

Sorry for the back-to-back posts, but I thought those of you growing chrysanthemums would be interested in this post from MSU on recognizing Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus symptoms in your crop.

To confirm the presence of TSWV, samples can be sent to Lab Services at the University of Guelph.

TSWV is vectored by thrips.  With temperatures between 25 and 28 C for the next 10 days, thrips reproduction will be rapid.  Control of thrips (and elimination of infected plant material) is necessary to reduce virus spread.

Thrips biological control can be achieved in floriculture greenhouses using the predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii and/or A. cucumeris in combination with the parasitic nematode S. felitiae and foliar applications of BotaniGard.  Registered chemicals for thrips in Ontario include:

  • Beleaf
  • BotaniGard
  • DDVP smoke
  • Dursban
  • Kontos
  • Malathion
  • Met 52
  • Pylon
  • Orthene
  • Success